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Intellect

BYU bands play their best at concert April 10

Brigham Young University’s two band ensembles will be performing at the University Bands Concert Tuesday, April 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets are available for $3 at byuarts.com/tickets or 801-422-4322.

Conductors Laurisa Christofferson, David Faires and Fred McInnis will lead each band in two separate performances for the concert. Christofferson and Faires’ band will perform four numbers, including “March from ‘1941’” by John Williams, “Undertow” by John Mackey and a four-part symphony called “Four Gypsy Dances” by Jan Van der Roost.

After an intermission, McInnis will conduct six pieces with his band, “Fanfare for the Common Man” by Aaron Copeland and “All Those Endearing Young Charms” featuring a euphonium solo by BYU faculty member Steve Call.

Due to its immense popularity, the BYU University Band was split into two ensembles to accommodate students from across campus. Open to all wind and percussion students, the University Band is separate from the Cougar Marching Band and enables music students to hone their skills on secondary instruments of their choice.

For more about this concert or the University Bands, contact Fred McInnis at (801) 422-3420 or fred_mcinnis@byu.edu or visit bands.byu.edu/ensembles/university_band.html.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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