Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU Ballroom Dance Company wins 23rd consecutive U.S. title

Brigham Young University’s Ballroom Dance Company emerged victorious once again as they won this month’s National Standard Ballroom Formation and Latin Formation Championships for the 23rd consecutive year at the Embassy Championships in Irvine, Calif.

“This event is one of the top, elite competitions in the United States,” said Lee Wakefield, Ballroom Dance Company director and Dance Department chair. “It attracts couples from all over the world.”

Besides winning at the California competition, the Ballroom Dance Company has won 16 titles at the British Championships, which attracts more teams with some of the most elite dancers in the world.

“The British Championships are like the granddaddy of ballroom dance competitions,” Wakefield said.

Wakefield attributed the team’s success to a solid, fundamental base developed from practicing technique and improving technical skills. BYU offers 15 different ballroom courses which team members are required to take.

“We do a great job with creativity and costumes, but without well-trained dancers, it’s impossible to have a consistently successful team,” Wakefield said.

For more information, contact Lee Wakefield at (801) 422-5087.

Writer: Brian Rust

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=