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Intellect

BYU audiology professor receives national humanitarian award

A Brigham Young University professor of audiology and speech-language pathology was recently awarded the 2004 Humanitarian Award from the American Academy of Audiology.

David McPherson, who also serves as department chair, received the award at the academy's national convention in Salt Lake City April 1.

The award is given to an individual who has made a direct humanitarian contribution to society in the realm of hearing. The recipient should have demonstrated direct and outstanding service to humanity in ways that are related to hearing, hearing disability, or deafness.

In presenting the award, the academy noted McPherson's efforts to assist and promote hearing healthcare around the world, including audiology training programs, newborn hearing screenings and lecturing in Poland, Russia and Vietnam.

"He is an exceptional human being whose heart is in his humanitarian work--whether it is on a local level through his commitment to his students, on a national level through his mentorship with other professionals or on an international level," the academy said in an announcement.

McPherson earned a bachelor's degree at BYU and a doctorate degree at the University of Washington. McPherson has taught at BYU since 1991 and has served as department chair since 1998.

For more information, call Kathy Pierce at (801) 422-5117.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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