Skip to main content
Intellect

Bulgarian poet, translator at BYU Kennedy Center lecture Sept. 12

A noted Bulgarian literary scholar will speak at an "Area Focus Lecture" sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies and the Center for European Studies Friday, Sept. 12, at 11 a.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on the Brigham Young University campus.

Alexander Shurbanov, a scholar, translator, poet and professor at the University of Sofia in Bulgaria, will share his research in a lecture titled "Bulgarian Literature in the Wake of Communism."

"The Kennedy Center's focus on interdisciplinary learning means gaining expertise in all aspects of a culture," said Jeff Ringer, Kennedy Center director. "To have a noted literary figure such as Shurbanov speak to us is a unique opportunity to broaden our understanding of Bulgaria and Eastern Europe."

Shurbanov is well-known both in Bulgaria and the United States as a translator and poet. He has translated into Bulgarian Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," Milton's "Paradise Lost," selected poems of Dylan Thomas and a variety of other works. He has published 12 books, including "Frost-Flowers," which is widely available in English.

Contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 for more information. Information about other upcoming events and lectures in the Kennedy Center can be found on the Web at http://kennedy.byu.edu/events.

Writer: Thomas Grover

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Teaching kids about money pays off — in finances and relationships, BYU study shows

January 13, 2022
A new study from BYU discovered that children who learn proper money management behavior from their parents have more fulfilling relationships with their significant others in young adulthood.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU researchers sequenced the quinoa genome. Now they’re introducing hybrids of the crop to developing nations

January 11, 2022
As soils across the world become less fertile and more desert-like due to climate change, it’s getting harder for farmers, especially those in developing nations, to grow basic life-preserving crops such as corn, wheat and rice.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Top 10 BYU News Stories of 2021

December 29, 2021
The most-read BYU News stories of the year include research on internet trolling, advances in holography, the formation of the new Office of Belonging, and the many ways students and faculty have strengthened one another as they continue to persevere through a pandemic.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=