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Intellect

“BEEyond” exhibit at BYU's Bean Museum to examine insect life Oct. 21-22

Exhibit opens with lectures Oct. 21 at 7 p.m.

The Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum at Brigham Young University will be opening its new art exhibit, “BEEyond,” Friday, Oct. 22.

“BEEyond” examines the majesty of the honeybee through the lens of photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher, who used the power of the electron microscope to explore the intricate details of this magnificent insect. Fisher is the author of the book “BEE,” which was the third-place winner in the International Photography Awards and was recently featured on NPR.

The exhibit will open with a reception Thursday, Oct. 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the museum, followed by a lecture by Fisher at 7 p.m. titled “BEEyond: A Microscopic Meeting of Art and Science.”

On Friday, the museum will host two lectures. The first will be “So You Think You Can Dance? The Tango of Bee Pollination,” by Leigh Johnson, BYU professor of biology, at 7 p.m. He will be followed by Shawn Clark, BYU associate professor and insect collection manager. His lecture will be titled “Here Today and Gone Tomorrow: Honeybee Colony Collapse.” All events are free and the public is welcome.

The museum is located at 645 East 1430 North, Provo, UT 84602. It is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. It is closed Sundays.

For more information, contact the museum at (801) 422-5051 or visit mlbean.byu.edu.

Writer: Philip Volmar

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