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Intellect

Annual Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture Feb. 10 considers children's emotional health

Ross A. Thompson, a professor of psychology and director of the Social and Emotional Development Lab at the University of California-Davis, will speak at the Seventh Annual Marjorie Pay Hinckley Endowed Chair Lecture Thursday, Feb. 10, at 7 p.m. in the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center at Brigham Young University.

Thompson’s lecture is titled “The Emotionate Child: Building Emotional Health and Compassion in Young Children” and will focus on the emotional health of children and the effect that relationships have on the ability of the child to develop and regulate emotions.

Admission is free, and the public is welcome to attend.

Thompson has a doctorate in psychology from the University of Michigan and has received extensive honors and awards for his work, including an award for Research Accomplishments on Behalf of Child Development Programs from the California Child Development Administrators Association in 2009, and the Ann L. Brown Award for Excellence in Developmental Research in 2007.

Thompson has also written books about children’s emotional health including “Preventing Child Maltreatment through Social Support: A Critical Analysis” (1995), “The Post-Divorce Family” (1999) and “Toward a Child-Centered and Neighborhood-Based Child Protection System” (2002).  He is working on a book titled “Early Brain Development, the Media and Public Policy.”

The Marjorie Pay Hinckley Endowed Chair in Social Work and the Social Sciences honors Sister Hinckley's commitment to strengthening home and family. The chair focuses on the development of women, strategies to help in difficult parenting situations and strategies to help children in difficult circumstances. A Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture is delivered every year by a prominent social sciences scholar.

For more information, contact Kim Reid at (801) 422-1320 or kim_reid@byu.edu.

 

Writer: Mel Gardner

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