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BYU seeks to develop students of faith, intellect, and character. In addition to teaching classes, most BYU professors also conduct research in their academic field. Students – even at the undergraduate level – participate in research and publish their work alongside a faculty mentor. Here are the stories of what they discover together.

Gil Fellingham

Using more than 100 years of MLB data, BYU researchers developed a home-run prediction model for current players.

Clifton Fleming and Gladriel Shobe in an aisle of the law library

Clifton Fleming and Gladriel Shobe have rocketed to the top of the field of tax law, ranking in the top 20 for most-downloaded scholarly articles. 

Dr. Dhanurjay “DJ” Patil shared how much good can be accomplished with an understanding of data science and sharing information at Tuesday’s BYU Forum. He shared many examples of how analyzing databases helped people, communities and the nation.

Most people agree that getting a little exercise helps when dealing with stress. A new BYU study discovers exercise under stress also helps protect your memory.

Jason Carroll

Researchers in BYU's School of Family Life have provided more insight into what may be one of the roots of the dissatisfaction caused by materialism – a diminished view of the importance of marriage itself. 

New research by BYU biologist Blaine Griffen finds the increase in swimming could permanently affect polar bear populations, leading to smaller bears, reduced reproduction rates and even increased risk of death for the bears.

BYU engineering professor and holography expert Daniel Smalley has long had a goal to create the same type of 3D image projection. In a paper published this week in Nature, Smalley details the method he has developed to do so.

Sister Sharon Eubank, director of LDS Charities and first counselor in the general presidency of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, encouraged meaningful service by treating others as brothers and sisters.

Jacob Crandall

BYU researchers developed an algorithm that teaches machines not just to win games, but to cooperate and compromise — and sometimes do a little trash-talking too.

Research by BYU ecosystem ecologist Ben Abbott presents a new tool to fight nutrient pollution. His study found that streams can be used as “sensors” of ecosystem health, allowing both improved water quality and food production.