Topics

Name

BYU seeks to develop students of faith, intellect, and character. In addition to teaching classes, most BYU professors also conduct research in their academic field. Students – even at the undergraduate level – participate in research and publish their work alongside a faculty mentor. Here are the stories of what they discover together.

scientists teaching science they're not trained to teach

Despite efforts from No Child Left Behind to promote “highly qualified” teaching, BYU research shows that just 36 percent of new science teachers are teaching only in their trained subject.

Amy Harris

History department professor Amy Harris told stories of dead cats and people to teach that many are missing the point with family history work at Tuesday's BYU Forum. 

Dream Illustration

A BYU dreamer (and professor) wants to help people better understand dreams to help improve their lives. So he and his colleagues built an app.

BYU civil engineering students traveled to the Dominican Republic earlier this year to help the island nation's water agencies forecast possible flooding with more lead-time than is now available.

four kinds of Facebook users

BYU researchers asked people why they Facebook, then identified four categories of users.

Cat in computer

There’s a reason marketers make appeals to our senses; the “snap, crackle and pop” of Rice Krispies makes us want to buy the cereal and eat it. But as savvy as marketers are, they may be missing an ingredient in their work.

BYU Abroad Takeover Participants

BYU recently featured five students in five study abroad locations over five days in Instagram Story takeovers, garnering 1.6 million views.

Nokbak screen shot

Nokbak is the third BYU-created video game in five years to be nominated as a finalist in E3’s College Game Competition.

Vespa ad still shot

A team of BYU students took the top prize in the country’s most competitive student advertising competition — for a project they did not for a class or client, but for fun.

KELT-9b and its host star

The temperature of KELT-9b, whose discovery BYU researchers contributed to, is 8,000 degrees Fahrenheit — just shy of the temperature of our sun.