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BYU seeks to develop students of faith, intellect, and character. In addition to teaching classes, most BYU professors also conduct research in their academic field. Students – even at the undergraduate level – participate in research and publish their work alongside a faculty mentor. Here are the stories of what they discover together.

Tanner Mangum Mental Health

A father’s depression has a direct effect on both internalized and externalized behavioral problems in adolescents, according to a recent study out of BYU's School of Social Work.

BYU's 2017 Student Innovator of the Year created a lightweight insulator that covers hammocks for cold-evening camping.

BYU chemistry researchers

With help from a palm-sized plastic rectangle, BYU researchers are hoping to minimize the problem of premature deliveries. The chip is designed to predict, with up to 90 percent accuracy, a woman’s risk for a future preterm birth.

BYU professor in front of newly discovered dinosaur

Meet Utah’s newly discovered dinosaur, Moabosaurus utahensis, whose past offers insights into the state’s ancient history.

Erin Kaseda

Erin Kaseda, just a junior, recently presented her research at a prestigious professional neuroscience conference in Spain, as one of just three students invited. She was the only undergrad.

Andrew Mills and bike

Mechanical engineering students at BYU have created a special adapter to a bike pedal that allows people with leg-length discrepancies and knee flexibility issues ride smoothly and painlessly.

toppling Lego

A BYU researcher's targeted sound vibrations can topple individual Lego figurines without touch — and the applications extend far beyond play.

Clay Ellis

You’ve tried it all: spreadsheets, software, the envelope system. And despite your best efforts, it seems like every month you blow your budget. One BYU student wants you to give it one more shot, using his budgeting app.

Understanding more about KELT-16b, though it’s “as different from Earth as you could possibly get,” might ultimately give scientists a better understanding of our own planet.

Brigham Young University researchers have developed new glass technology that could add a new level of flexibility to the microscopic world of medical devices.