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Intellect

"You Can Do This: An Approach to Raising Wonderful Children" to be aired on BYU Television April 5-6

Hosted by David O. McKay School of Education

Brigham Young University’s David O. McKay School of Education will host You Can Do This: An Approach to Raising Wonderful Children on BYU Television Saturday, April 5, at 6 p.m., Sunday, April 6, at noon and on Tuesday, April 29, at 7:30 p.m.

You Can Do This focuses on issues affecting family life. The audience will meet actual families who will share their concerns about the challenges and uncertainties of parenting.

The program also outlines actual teaching strategies, developed by behavior experts, that parents can use to help their children make better choices, help improve communication and make the home less contentious.

In addition to showing these families’ very personal journeys; You Can Do This talks with Richard Young, dean of the McKay School of Education, about how parents can unknowingly become a toxic influence in the home, and how to remedy the situation.

For more information on You Can Do This, or to get more details about parenting concepts and techniques, visit http://education.byu.edu/youcandothis. For rebroadcast information, visit byubroadcasting.org.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

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