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Intellect

Women in the African peace process subject of BYU lecture Oct. 7

The recipient of the 2008 Right Livelihood Award known as the alternative Nobel Prize, Asha Haji Elmi will present “Sixth Clan in Somalia: Women’s Influence for Peace,” at a Brigham Young University David M. Kennedy Center lecture Wednesday, Oct. 7, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Elmi formed the Sixth Clan, a women's network after women were excluded from the peace process in Somalia, which involved the five traditional clans. The Sixth Clan won a place in the discussion, and she was selected to the Transitional Federal Parliament of the Republic of Somalia in August 2004 and served until 2009.

Elmi is also the founder of Save Somali Women and Children, created in 1992 during the height of the Somali Civil War, and is an activist against female genital mutilation. Her activism has been recognized in Somalia and elsewhere in Africa.

This lecture will be archived online. For more information on events sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, visit the calendar online at kennedy.byu.edu.

For more information about this lecture, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

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