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Intellect

Violist Yizhak Schotten at BYU Primrose Memorial Concert March 3

Israeli-born violist Yizhak Schotten will be the guest artist at Brigham Young University’s annual William Primrose Memorial Concert Saturday, March 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. Admission is free.

The program will be an “Evening of Transcriptions” featuring works by Bach, Liszt and Mendelssohn.

A feature article about Yizhak Schotten in STRAD Magazine called him "one of America's finest viola players, a leading light of the U.S. viola establishment."

Schotten studied with renowned violinist William Primrose at Indiana University and the University of Southern California. He also studied with Lillian Fuchs at the Manhattan School of Music.

He will be accompanied by his wife, Kathleen Collier. She tours and records extensively with her husband  and is on the faculty at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

The Primrose Memorial Concert is an annual event that honors legendary violist and former BYU faculty member William Primrose (1903–1982). The concert series features violists from around the globe, who, like Primrose, distinguish themselves on the instrument and promote its scholarship.

For more information, contact Claudine Bigelow at (801) 422-1315 or Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348, ken_crossley@byu.edu. To learn more about Yizhak Schotten and his music, visit www.yizhakschotten.com/.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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