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Intellect

VENUE CHANGE: Paraguayan ambassador to speak at BYU March 27

His Excellency James Spalding, Paraguayan ambassador to the U.S., will speak at an Ambassadorial Insights Lecture at Brigham Young University on Thursday, March 27, at 11 a.m. in the Hinckley Center at Brigham Young University.

Spalding was appointed Paraguayan ambassador to the U.S. in 2004, having previously served as co-founder and director of the Sustainable Development Advisory Group (GADES).

He formed a part of the Economic Transition Commission of President Duarte Frutos in 2003, developing the 100-Day Plan for state-owned companies.

Spalding worked for 10 years in the public sector, where he occupied key economic policy postings, including minister of finance, vice minister of economy and integration at the Ministry of Finance, vice minister of commerce, president of Paraguayan Petroleum, and vice minister of integration.

He received his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a master’s degree in economics from Rutgers University.

This lecture will be archived online. For more informationon about David M. Kennedy Center events, see the calendar online at kennedy.byu.edu.

Writer: David Luker

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