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Intellect

Value of motherhood topic of Kimball Scholar lectures June 30 and July 1

The Women's Research Institute and the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University will welcome Ann Crittenden, award-winning journalist and author, as a Kimball Visiting Scholar.

On Monday, June 30, at 4 p.m., Crittenden will discuss her best-selling book, "The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World is Still the Least Valued," and on Tuesday, July 1 from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., her topic will focus on "The Motherhood Dilemma."

The public is invited to attend both lectures in the Kennedy Center conference room located in the Herald R. Clark Building south of the Lee Library on the BYU campus.

With her book, Crittenden has launched a national discussion about the last great obstacle to women's equality. Women may have won respect for their accomplishments in the workplace, but they have yet to win respect or material recognition for their work at home, according to Crittenden.

Her writings reveal the enormous price that mothers, other caregivers, children and society pay for this economic disregard.

Crittenden is a former economics reporter for the "New York Times" where she wrote on a broad range of economic issues, initiated many investigative reports and authored a series on world hunger that was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. She has also been a reporter for "Fortune," a financial writer and foreign correspondent for "Newsweek" and an occasional commentator for "CBS News."

She has a bachelor's degree from Southern Methodist University, a master's degree from Columbia University School of International Affairs and is completing a doctorate in modern European history from Columbia University.

Crittenden's visit was made possible through the School of Family Life and the Camilla Kimball Visiting Scholar Program. This program provides funding for a variety of activities, including the support of bringing visiting scholars to campus, thus introducing students and faculty to different aspects of research on the family.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

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