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Intellect

Utah Symphony to perform Sibelious, Glazunov at BYU March 15

Reception funded by Laycock Center for Creative Collaboration in the Arts

The Utah Symphony under the direction of David Cho will present an evening of works by Sibelius and Glazunov in the de Jong Concert Hall at Brigham Young University Thursday, March 15, at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are $16 for the public, $12 for faculty and staff and $8 for students. Tickets can be purchased by calling (801) 422-7664, by visiting the Fine Arts Ticket Office or by visiting performances.byu.edu.

Sibelius’ “Night Ride and Sunrise” and Symphony No. 5 are on the program, along with Glazunov’s Concerto for Violin performed by Utah Symphony concertmaster Ralph Matson. After the concert a reception will be held in the lobby of the Harris Fine Arts Center.

The reception is funded by a grant BYU student interns applied for and received from the Laycock Center for Creative Collaboration in the Arts at BYU. These interns, called “marketing ambassadors,” created ads, flyers and posters and helped market the Utah Symphony’s yearly concert on campus. They have also arranged for musicians of the orchestra to give master classes to music students at BYU.

For more information, contact Kenneth V. Crossley at (801) 422-9348.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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