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Intellect

Utah cultural history to be discussed during BYU lecture March 31

The Utah state history director will discuss "Utah's Cultural and Ethnic Diversities" at an International Forum Series lecture Wednesday, March 31, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on the Brigham Young University campus.

Philip F. Notarianni has worked for the past 25 years for the Utah State Historical Society, holding positions in the areas of historic preservation and museum services and mounting exhibits on Utah, mining and ethnic history.

In addition to his work with the Historical Society, Notarianni has worked as an associate professor/lecturer in the ethnic studies program at the University of Utah and as a temporary faculty member in cultural anthropology for the University of Calabria in Cosenza, Italy.

During the 1987–88 academic year, Notarianni researched the places of origin of Calabresi in Utah under a Fulbright grant. Notarianni's parents are Italian immigrants and his wife Maria Teresa Maletta is an immigrant from Calabria, Italy.

The lecture is sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. The center archives lectures and posts a calendar online at http://kennedy.byu.edu .

For more information about this or other lectures, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Lee Simons

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