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Intellect

Utah Colleges Exit Poll seeks student volunteers

The Utah Colleges Exit Poll is seeking students to help out during this year’s elections. Those interested are encouraged to sign up at the exit poll’s website, exitpoll.byu.edu.

Since early September, nearly three dozen students in the Political Science and Statistics Departments at Brigham Young University have been organizing this year’s poll. The work includes drawing a random sample, designing surveys, training students as Election Day interviewers and programming computer systems data input.

“The exit poll class is really great at covering the mechanics of the exit poll, but without the help of pollsters on Election Day, the project will fall apart,” said Alissa Wilkinson, Recruiting Committee chair.

The Utah Colleges Exit Poll began in 1982 under the direction of BYU professors Howard Christensen and David Magleby. Now an institution of Utah politics, the exit poll provides practical experience for students to supplement their classroom instruction, timely and accurate predictions of Election Day results, and insights into voting behavior in Utah. The poll is sponsored by BYU’s Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy.

For more information, contact Trevor McIntyre, Utah Colleges Exit Poll Public Relations chair, at (818) 687-1853.

Writer: Trevor McIntyre

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