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Intellect

Unique BYU art exhibit celebrates professor's legacy

An art exhibit featuring the art work of several Brigham Young University alumni will be featured daily in the B.F. Larsen Gallery at the Harris Fine Arts Center until Friday Nov. 13. The gallery is open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. every day except Sunday.

The exhibition is titled “A Product of Time and Faith: Professor Hagen Haltern’s Intensive Drawing Studio, 1982/2009.” It features the work of Haltern, who just recently retired from the BYU visual arts faculty, and his students from 1982: Jacqui Biggs Larsen, Mark England, Bruce Robertson, Bob Adams, Anne Cordes Daines, Tom Schulte, Keri Vincent Skousen, Richard Gate and Brent Orton.

“These students studied under the tutelage of Professor Haltern for eight hours a day, four days a week throughout an entire year,” said curator James Swensen. “They learned how to experiment and explore in a way that few are able to enjoy.”

Now, after 27 years, these artists are still creating in their own unique way. This exhibition details the legacy of one professor’s efforts and a creative teaching that has sustained these individuals for nearly three decades.

For more information, contact James Swenson at (801) 708-2913.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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