Skip to main content
Intellect

Two BYU broadcast students win national minority fellowship

Two Brigham Young University students have been selected for the Meredith-Cronkite Fellowship, a week-long program for top minority broadcast students.

The Meredith Corp. and the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University chose BYU students Marco Villarreal and Josh Molina as two of ten students across the nation selected to participate in the fellowship. Five of the ten students automatically come from ASU and BYU is the only school to have two students chosen to fill the remaining slots.

The fellowship program, which began in January 2007, is designed to identify candidates for newsroom jobs for stations around the country and to give promising broadcast journalism students experience.

In January 2008, Villarreal and Molina will spend one week in the CBS 5 newsroom in Phoenix, where they will work with the station’s reporters, producers, editors, videographers and instructors from the Cronkite School. Their work will include creating news packages and producing a 30-minute broadcast on deadline.

For more information, visit cronkite.asu.edu.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
June 22, 2021
New BYU research recently published in the journal of Social Media + Society sheds light on the motives and personality characteristics of internet trolls.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 17, 2021
Engineering graduate student Jacob Sheffield has created a tiny origami-based device that serves as a miniature windshield wiper for laparoscope camera lenses.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 13, 2021
BYU geography professor Matt Bekker says record-breaking temperatures certainly contribute to Utah's water problem through evaporation, but the less-noticeable warming trend over months and years is the bigger problem. Most of the last 20 years have been drought years.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=