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Intellect

Trends in Asia-Pacific area subject for BYU Wheatley lecture March 14

Ralph A. Cossa, president of the Pacific Forum CSIS in Honolulu, will address "As America Pivots: Trends and Opportunities in the Asia-Pacific Region” at Brigham Young University Wednesday, March 14, at 7:30 p.m in the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center.

This event is sponsored by BYU’s Wheatley Institution, and the public is welcome to attend.

Cossa is a founding member and former international co-chair of the multinational Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP), which links member committees from 21 Asia–Pacific countries. He also sits on the board of the Pacific Asian Affairs Council and is a member of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, the Council on U.S.–Korean Security Studies and the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

He is senior editor of the Pacific Forum's electronic journal Comparative Connections and is a member of the editorial boards of a number of international journals, including Korea Review and Security Challenges, and he is a frequent contributor to regional newspapers.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

 

 

Writer: Charles Krebs

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