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Intellect

Tickets on sale Feb. 4 for Passover Seder Services in March, April

The annual Passover Seder Services at Brigham Young University, conducted on campus for nearly 40 years, have been scheduled for March 8, 22 and April 12 in 3228 Wilkinson Student Center and March 15 in 3280/3290 WSC. The services will all begin at 6:30 p.m. and end around 9 p.m.

Tickets will go on sale beginning Feb. 4 at 271 Joseph Smith Building. Ticket prices are $25 for the public and $17 for current BYU students, faculty and staff.

This year’s services will be hosted and led by Jeffrey Chadwick, a member of the BYU Religious Education faculty and a specialist in Jewish studies.

The BYU Passover Seder service will include the biblical unleavened bread and bitter herbs, and will feature other festival foods and traditions of the Passover, all in a specially catered meal.

The Passover has its origins in the Old Testament and also has important New Testament associations. The BYU Passover experience enriches appreciation of the ancient Israelite and modern Jewish celebration commemorating the deliverance of Israel from Egypt. Historically, Jesus celebrated the Passover in Jerusalem, and the Last Supper was a Passover Seder meal.

For more information, call the Passover tipline at (801) 422-8325 or Patty Smith at (801) 422-3611.

Writer: Preston Wittwer

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