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Intellect

Three BYU students named Barry M. Goldwater Scholars

Three Brigham Young University students were recently named Barry M. Goldwater Scholars for the 2004-05 school year.

Joseph L. Cooper, an honors student majoring in computer science; Morgan L. Quigley, majoring in computer science; and Randall Mark Stoltenberg, majoring in chemistry, were recognized.

The scholarships cover the cost of tuition, fees, books and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year of undergraduate education.

More than 300 Goldwater Scholarships were awarded nationwide for the 2004-05 academic year to undergraduate sophomores and juniors.

The scholarship program was designed to foster and encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering.

The Goldwater Scholarship is the premier undergraduate award of its type in these fields, garnering the attention of prestigious post-graduate fellowship programs.

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was established by Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman, including 30 years of service in the U.S. Senate.

For more information, call BYU Undergraduate Education at (801) 422-6136.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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