Skip to main content
Intellect

Student work featured in senior dance showcase at BYU March 31-April 1

The Department of Dance at Brigham Young University presents the senior dance showcase, "Many Faces, Many Paths," on Thursday and Friday, March 31-April 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the Dance Studio Theatre, 166 Richards Building.

The showcase is free and open to the public.

The showcase will feature nine seniors graduating in dance who will present pieces they choreographed, directed or performed.

"Many different styles and genres of dance are represented in the program, including ballet, social dance, ballroom, musical theatre, jazz and world dances" said Cathy Black, faculty advisor.

The world dances represent Irish, East Indian and Polynesian cultural movements.

"Each world dance is true to cultural movement, and each dance also has a journey whereby the forms are dealt with creatively by infusing with other kinds of dance genres," Black said.

Students presenting their work are Hillary Boeing, Allison Shields, Amanda Luschin, Katherine Dixon, Beth Taylor, Alison Simpson, Cammie Taylor, Jennifer Grow and Elizabeth Ellsworth.

Each of the pieces presented in the showcase show a unique style and theme. One dance piece uses American Sign Language as the theme. Sign language is used throughout the piece expressing feelings of deaf people in a hearing world.

A less serious piece exaggerates the process of shopping and begins at Sears. Another piece depicts the development of a relationship between a boy and girl who met in a Social Dance 180 class.

The senior project is a capstone experience designed for students to demonstrate their understanding of performance, technique and composition.

For more information contact Cathy Black at (801) 422-2377.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Going cashless to prevent COVID-19 was useless, new BYU microbiology study finds

May 12, 2022
A new study published in PLOS ONE from BYU scientists finds that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is almost immediately nonviable if deposited on a cash banknote. The virus actually shows greater stability on plastic money cards, with the live virus still being detected 48 hours after initial deposition, but no viable virus was detected on either cash or card that was randomly sampled in the study.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU student’s research solves an icy dwarf planet mystery

May 09, 2022
The dwarf planet Haumea has befuddled modern scientists for years. New BYU research details the planet's creation and solves one of astronomy's puzzles.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

When it comes to buying stuff, who do you trust to sell it: Government, nonprofits or for-profits? BYU study says...

April 26, 2022
Covid-19 tests were in short supply two months ago, but now testing options abound, from free tests mailed by the U.S. government to those available from pharmacies and nonprofit healthcare providers. All other factors being equal, is there an advantage to accessing a test through any one of these avenues?
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=