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Intellect

Second Annual Corpus Christi Medieval Theatre Festival at BYU April 7

The Second Annual Corpus Christi Medieval Theatre Festival, hosted by the Brigham Young University medieval history and reenactment club The Quill and the Sword, will be from noon to 6 p.m. in the courtyard of the Joseph F. Smith Building Saturday, April 7. Admission is $5, and children under eight will be admitted for free.

The festival will include several plays from the medieval York Cycle, including "Joseph's Trouble about Mary," "The Second Shepherd's Play," "The Resurrection" and others. Performances will also feature "Joseph Smith," an original play about the first President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints written by Tom Doggett, which tells the story of the First Vision in the style of a medieval cycle play.

Also on the schedule are demonstrations on medieval life and activities, including dancing, arts and crafts, period rapier fencing and more. After 6 p.m., there will be a free Bardic celebration, with song and storytelling performances going later into the evening.

In the Middle Ages, Corpus Christi (Latin for "Body of Christ") was a feast day originally created in celebration of the sacrament. Normally held in the summer, BYU's festival is scheduled just before Easter and will be a celebration of the life of Christ.

For more information, contact Travis Schenck at (907) 617-6342.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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