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Intellect

Scott Miller Appointed Dean of the College of Humanities

J. Scott Miller, BYU professor of Japanese and comparative literature, will be the new dean of the BYU College of Humanities. He will begin a five-year term on June 1. Miller is replacing John Rosenberg, who has served in this role for a decade. 

"Scott brings a combination of experiences that prepare him well for this new responsibility," said Academic Vice President Brent W. Webb. "I am confident he will continue the legacy of outstanding leadership by his predecessors in the dean's office." 

Miller joined the faculty at BYU in 1994. Currently chair of the department of Asian & Near Eastern Languages, Miller has served as Asian Studies coordinator in the David M. Kennedy Center, associate dean of Undergraduate Education, director of the Honors Program and co-director of BYU's International Cinema program.

Before coming to BYU, Miller was an associate professor of Japanese at Colgate University, in Hamilton, NY. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in comparative literature from BYU, and a Master of Arts and Ph.D. in East Asian studies from Princeton University.

"Scott is a true intellectual with interests that bridge east and west," said John Rosenberg, outgoing College of Humanities dean. "His judgment is sound and his demeanor is kind, and I very much look forward to him being my dean."

Rosenberg has been serving as dean of the College of Humanities since 2005. Under his tenure, the new home for the college - the Joseph F. Smith Building - was completed. He also oversaw the implementation of the Humanities+ program, which creates enriched learning and professionally relevant experiences to give students skill sets to translate classroom learning to jobs.

"John's tenure has been marked by a deep commitment to the mission of the university to provide the finest disciplinary education possible," Webb said. "This college - its students, faculty and programs - has never been stronger or more confident than under John's exceptional leadership."

J. Scott Miller

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