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Intellect

Scott Holden will present BYU faculty piano recital

The Brigham Young University School of Music will present Scott Holden in a faculty piano recital Saturday, Feb. 18, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

The performance is free and the public is welcome to attend.

The program will include “Nun komm’ der Heiden Heiland” by Bach and Busoni, “In the Mist” by Leos Janaceck and the Sonata, Op. 1 by Alban Berg.

Tenor Lawrence Vincent will perform selections from “In Burning Vision: Sonnets on Joseph Smith” with music by David Sargent and text by Gideon O. Burton, accompanied by Holden.

The piano recital will also feature John Bull’s “30 Variations on Waslingham” and Franz Liszt’s “Rhapsodie Espagnole.”

Holden enjoys an active career as a soloist, chamber musician and professor of piano. He has music degrees from the University of Michigan, the Manhattan School of Music and the Juilliard School, where he was awarded the Horowitz Prize.

He also spent a year studying and performing in Budapest at the Liszt Academy, where he was a Fulbright Scholar.

For more information, contact Scott Holden at (801) 422-7713

Writer: Angela Fischer

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