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Intellect

Scott Holden to present BYU faculty piano recital Feb. 24

Scott Holden, Brigham Young University School of Music faculty artist and chair of piano and organ studies, will appear in recital Tuesday, Feb. 24, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center.

The performance is free, and tickets are not required.

The recital will feature the Sonata in C Major by Franz Joseph Haydn, “Lullaby” by Aaron Jay Kernis and the Partita No. 6 in E Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach.

Following an intermission, Holden will be joined by fellow piano faculty member Robin Hancock for Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” arranged by the composer for two pianos.

Scott Holden enjoys an active career as soloist, chamber musician and teacher, and he has performed in 30 different American states and nine European countries as well as Canada and Mexico.

As first-prize winner of the 1996 Leschetizky New York Debut Competition, he made his Carnegie Recital Hall concert debut. He has also performed at the Kennedy Center and Lincoln Center. Performances have been aired on the CBC, NPR and NBC, and he has had numerous radio and television appearances on KBYU. Holden is a member of BYU's popular American Piano Quartet.

For more information, contact Scott Holden at (801) 422-7713.

Writer: Brady Toone

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