Skip to main content
Intellect

School of Music hosts faculty piano-clarinet recital Sept. 21

The Brigham Young University School of Music will present a faculty recital featuring Jaren Hinckley on clarinet and Scott Holden on piano Thursday, Sept. 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. Admission is free.

The duo typically plays selections that audiences rarely hear in performances, and this recital will be no exception, Holden said.

“Jaren picks interesting programs that might be more on the fringes of traditional repertoire,” he said. “He likes exploring and presenting a program that some people might be unfamiliar with.”

For instance, Victor Babin’s “Hillandale Waltzes” is “full of high jinks,” Holden said. “Babin takes a bland theme and gets pure gold out of what is so pedestrian.”

Other pieces on the program will include “Frensham Pond” by William Lloyd Webber and “Elegy” by Frank Bencriscutto.

Hinckley received a doctorate in clarinet performance from Florida State University. He has performed with the Utah Symphony, the Manhattan School of Music Philharmonia and the Canyonlands New Music Ensemble.

Holden is active as a soloist and chamber musician. He earned music degrees from the University of Michigan, the Manhattan School of Music and the Juilliard School, where he received the Horowitz Prize.

For more information, contact Jaren Hinckley at (801) 422-6339 or Scott Holden at (801) 422-7713.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
June 22, 2021
New BYU research recently published in the journal of Social Media + Society sheds light on the motives and personality characteristics of internet trolls.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 17, 2021
Engineering graduate student Jacob Sheffield has created a tiny origami-based device that serves as a miniature windshield wiper for laparoscope camera lenses.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 13, 2021
BYU geography professor Matt Bekker says record-breaking temperatures certainly contribute to Utah's water problem through evaporation, but the less-noticeable warming trend over months and years is the bigger problem. Most of the last 20 years have been drought years.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=