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Intellect

Salt Lake Tabernacle subject of new book from BYU Religious Studies Center

The Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center has released a book by BYU professor Scott C. Esplin featuring an in-depth review of the construction and restoration of the Salt Lake Tabernacle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

“The Tabernacle: An Old and Wonderful Friend” features beautiful recent and historic photographs and will soon be available for purchase at the BYU Bookstore. The price of the book is $24.95.

In 1947, Stewart L. Grow, grandson of Henry Grow, the pioneer bridge builder who built the roof structure of the historic Tabernacle, wrote a thesis on the building of the Tabernacle. Sixty years later, in “The Tabernacle: An Old and Wonderful Friend,” Esplin examines and adds to Grow’s original thesis.

“The venue continues to serve as a spiritual and social gathering place for the community, hosting significant gatherings of Church members as well as other civic functions,” Esplin wrote in the book’s introductory essay. “Even though larger and more modern facilities have been added to Salt Lake City, the Tabernacle continues to be an important part of the downtown landscape.”

Esplin is a professor of Church history at BYU. Prior to joining the religious education faculty, he taught for the Church Educational System for nine years. His research and expertise are in 20th century Church history and LDS educational history.

For more information, visit religion.byu.edu.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

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