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Intellect

Rollin H. Hotchkiss to present BYU devotional Dec. 8

Rollin H. Hotchkiss, associate chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Brigham Young University, will present “God Loves You” at a campus devotional Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 11:05 a.m. at the Marriott Center.

The devotional will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels. Visit byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu for rebroadcast and archive information.

Hotchkiss began teaching at BYU in 2005. His research interests include river restoration and sediment transport. Before joining BYU faculty, he worked for nine years at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and seven years at Washington State University.

He has been the recipient of several teaching awards at each location, including the 2005 Lean Luck Most Effective Professor, the Reviewer’s Award, Hydro Review and the James M. Robbins Excellence in Teaching Award, a nationwide Chi Epsilon Honorary Society recognition.

Hotchkiss earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from BYU. He also obtained a master’s degree from Utah State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota after working for the Tennessee Valley Authority for six years.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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