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Intellect

Robert L. Millet appointed associate director of BYU Faculty Center

Robert L. Millet, professor of ancient scripture and former dean of Religious Education at Brigham Young University, has been named the associate director of the BYU Faculty Center.

The Richard L. Evans Professor of Religious Understanding at BYU, Millet replaces Terry Olson who has returned to full-time teaching and research in the School of Family Life.

Millet joins Faculty Center director David A. Whetten in administrating the center.

"Robert L. Millet brings a wealth of experience to this position," said Richard Williams, associate academic vice president for faculty. "He has been committed to faculty development during his tenure in administrative positions."

"He combines a thoughtful understanding of the mission of BYU with very strong academic credentials," he said. "He has been a productive scholar throughout his career and is uniquely situated to communicate and work effectively across the breadth of departments and colleges at BYU."

"This appointment is effective immediately, and we are happy to have him in place in time for the spring seminar for new faculty," said Williams.

Millet received bachelor of science and master of science degrees in psychology from BYU and a doctorate from Florida State University in religious studies. He has worked with Social Services and Seminaries and Institutes for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and joined the BYU Religious Education faculty in 1983.

Founded in 1992, the BYU Faculty Center aims to improve teaching and learning, support faculty and strengthen the university. The Faculty Center supports quality teaching, scholarship, citizenship and collegiality among faculty and all who teach at BYU.

Writer: Cecelia Fielding

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