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Intellect

Religion books relocated in Harold B. Lee Library

Brigham Young University faculty and students looking for materials for a Book of Mormon or world religions class will no longer find them on the fifth floor of the Harold B. Lee Library. The Religion Collection was relocated this past summer to its new home on the library’s second level.

Almost all of the library’s religion books can be found in the newly named Religion/Family History Library located east of the atrium on level two in room 2250. Special Collections, located on level one, also has a small collection of religion books and materials for preservation and special research.

“It was necessary to combine the religion collection with the family history library so that patrons could use both resources together,” said Michael Hunter, Mormon Studies librarian. “The religion library is also located closer to Special Collections, where many students, faculty and patrons do religion research.”

Philosophy books and materials can still be found in their regular place on the fifth floor.

In addition, the religion subject librarians are also available in the Religion/Family History Library to assist patrons with their research needs.

For more information, contact the Library at (801) 422-6200 or visit the Web site at www.library.byu.edu.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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