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Intellect

Registration underway for annual Rex E. Lee Run Against Cancer March 17

The 17th annual Rex Lee Run Against Cancer at Brigham Young University, with proceeds going to the BYU Cancer Research Center, will be held Saturday, March 17, with the races beginning at 9 a.m.

The 5K run costs $15 and the 10K run costs $20 if registered by Friday, March 16. Registering the day of the run will cost an extra $5. Pre-race registration can be done online at rexleerun.byu.edu. Those who have preregistered can pick up their t-shirts and bibs on the Thursday or Friday before the race at the booth in the Wilkinson Student Center from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and the University Parkway Center from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Participants will wear an electronic chip on their shoe for timing during the race. This timer will activate the moment a participant steps over the start line and crosses the finish line, so participants should keep back from the line until the race has started to ensure accurate timing.

Medals will be given to men and women winners in various age brackets. Many prizes will be awarded through a random drawing after the race.

The race honors former BYU President Rex Lee who was U.S. Solicitor General and an avid runner. Lee died of lymphoma in 1996. The first Rex Lee Run, organized by cancer survivors in his honor, was held a few weeks after his passing.

For more information, contact D. Lynn Patten at (801) 422-4022 or at lynn_patten@byu.edu.

Writer: Charles Krebs

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