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Intellect

"Reap the Wild Wind" to open BYU classic film series Sept. 25

A combination of legendary producer-director Cecil B. DeMille, Technicolor, John Wayne and adventure will begin the 11th season of the Brigham Young University Motion Picture Archive Film Series on Friday, Sept. 25, at 7 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

"Reap the Wild Wind" is the 1942 adventure of ship salvagers along the Florida Keys in the 1840s, starring Ray Milland, John Wayne and Paulette Goddard. Doors open at 6:30 PM. Admission is free, but early arrival is recommended. No food or drink is permitted in the auditorium. Children 8 years and older are welcome.

James D’Arc, curator of the BYU Motion Picture Archive, will provide an introduction to the DeMille sea saga, and will show rare items from the Cecil B. DeMille Archive preserved in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections at BYU’s Lee Library.

The BYU Motion Picture Archive Film Series presents original prints of classic American films from the Lee Library’s permanent collection of classic motion pictures. The series is sponsored by L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Friends of the Harold B. Lee Library, and Dennis & Linda Gibson.

A complete schedule of the series can be accessed online at sc.lib.byu.edu.

For more information, contact James V. D'Arc at james_darc@byu.edu.

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