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Intellect

Q'd Up Faculty Jazz Quintet in concert Jan. 28

The Brigham Young University School of Music presents the Q'd Up Faculty Jazz Quintet in concert Wednesday, Jan. 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

The performance is free and the public is welcome to attend.

The quintet features BYU School of Music faculty members Ray Smith, reeds; Ron Brough, percussion; Steve Lindeman, keyboards; Jay Lawrence, vibes; and Matt Larson, bass.

Some of the Q'd Up members have been playing together for decades, and they have released two albums as a group.

The performance will also feature several tunes with BYU's Kelly Eisenhour performing vocal jazz.

"Each performance is a little different," Q'd Up member Ron Brough said. "We're always arranging and writing and bringing new styles to each concert."

Brough says that the concert is unique because jazz is music that is created in the moment.

"A jazz concert is going to be different each time it's performed," Brough said. "We're very progressive in what we do, and each of us brings a different element to the music."

For more information on Q'd Up, contact Ron Brough at (801) 422-3320.

Writer: Rachel M. Sego

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