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Intellect

Prominent politicians at BYU subject for gallery exhibit opening Jan. 16

The Education in Zion Gallery at Brigham Young University will open a new exhibition focusing on politicians Wednesday, Jan. 16.  

Marie Bates, gallery educator who helped curate the exhibition, said the exhibit will provide a balanced political view and showcases some of the better-known politicians who have visited the university in the past. 

“The quotations used in the exhibition show the leaders of BYU and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are aware of politics and that they want members to be involved as well,” Bates said.

Eight politicians from the Democratic and Republican Party will be featured, including Robert F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The exhibition will also have quotations from Church leaders about becoming involved in the political process.

The Education in Zion Gallery is located in the Joseph F. Smith Building west of the Harold B. Lee Library on campus. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The gallery stays open until 9 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Saturday hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The gallery will be closed Dec. 24-25, Dec. 31 and Jan. 1.

For more information, contact Heather Seferovich, (801) 422-3451, heather_seferovich@byu.edu, or visit www.educationinzion.byu.edu.  

Writer: Hwa Lee

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