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Intellect

Pre-modern Europe topic for David M. Kennedy Center lecture Sept. 22

Dallas G. Denery, associate professor of history at Bowdoin College, will be lecturing Thursday, Sept. 22, at 2 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on the Brigham Young University campus. His topic will be “Flatterers, Wheedlers and Gossip-Mongers: The Importance of Lying in Pre-Modern Europe.”

Denery specializes in medieval and early modern intellectual and religious history. His publications include "Christine de Pizan on Misogyny, Gossip and Possibility” in the Middle Ages in Texts and Texture (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming), and "Seeing and Being Seen in the Late Medieval World: Optics, Theology and Religious Life" (Cambridge University Press, 2005; paperback 2009).

He received a bachelor's degree in philosophy from UC-Berkeley, a master's degree in philosophy from the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology and a doctorate in history from UC-Berkeley.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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