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Intellect

Popular Songwriters Showcase at BYU Nov. 30

The Brigham Young University Songwriters Showcase performance celebrates its 20th anniversary with fresh new music written by BYU students on Tuesday, Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital hall.

Admission is free and open to the public.

The showcase features students in the songwriting class who are interested in the music business.

"The students are free to pick their own style of music, so you will hear any style that is related to pop and chartered by the music industry." said Ron Simpson, professor of the songwriting class.

Approximately 30 students are in the class, but only 15-18 students will present their work in the showcase.

Many people who have taken the songwriting class have successfully entered into the music business including Hilary Weeks, Tyler Castleton, Cherie Call and Julie De Azevedo. Daniel Cahoon, who is currently taking the class, is a member of an up-and-coming band in Nashville called "Marshall Dyllon."

"The songs are great because they'll be fresh and original," Simpson said. "They're songs right out of the oven."

For more information contact Ron Simpson at (801) 422-6395.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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