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Intellect

Popular Christmas Booktalk at BYU's Lee Library Nov. 6

The Christmas Booktalk, an annual event that attracts interested holiday readers to the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University, will be Monday, Nov. 6 at 4 p.m. in the auditorium on the first level.

Parents, teachers and others interested in books for children and young adults – holiday stories and other kinds – can come to the free event to hear Janice Card, a BYU Bookstore book buyer, discuss more than 50 new titles that can be found at the Bookstore and eventually at the library. The Bookstore will also have an assortment of books, posters, pencils and other items to give away to attendees.

What began as a simple book review group evolved into an event that had to be moved to the larger auditorium in the library with more and more people attending every year.

“The event promotes books and reading in general,” says Gabriele Kupitz, Lee Library children’s literature cataloger. “There is a greater interest in children’s books this time of year. Christmas is usually a big time for people to give books, not just to children but to adults also.”

The booktalk kicks off National Children’s Book Week Nov. 13-19.

For more information, contact Gabriele Kupitz at gabriele_kupitz@byu.edu or visit the library’s Web site at www.library.byu.edu.

Writer: Michael Hooper

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