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Intellect

Patricia Ravert named associate dean of BYU College of Nursing

Patricia (Patty) Ravert has been named associate dean for academic undergraduate affairs at the Brigham Young University College of Nursing, according to Dean Beth V. Cole.

Ravert earned her bachelor of science and master of science degrees in nursing from BYU and her doctorate from the University of Utah.

For the past several years she has coordinated the Nursing Learning Center, a laboratory that provides students with hands-on learning via human patient simulators prior to working in actual clinical settings.

Ravert’s extensive work in simulation was recently recognized by the National League for Nursing, which invited her to participate with seven other national simulation experts in a three-year project focused on the advancement of simulation in nursing education in the U. S. as well as in several international locations.

She will continue her work in simulation in addition to her the responsibilities as associate dean.

For more information, contact Rose Ann Jarrett at (801) 422-4143.

Writer: Rose Ann Jarrett

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