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Intellect

Paper by BYU history major wins regional competition

Brigham Young University undergraduate Gregory Jackson, a history major, was awarded the best undergraduate paper prize at the recent Phi Alpha Theta Regional History Conference held at Utah State University on March 29.

"There were several outstanding papers presented on that occasion, so Jackson's paper achieved true distinction," said BYU history professorGlen M. Cooper.

His paper, "Churchill and Oil: The Creation of Iraq and its Effects Today," was based on research in primary documents from the Churchill Archive at Cambridge University conducted while he was a summer student as part of a BYU study program.

Phi Alpha Theta is a national organization of historians whose purpose is to promote the study of history.

Writer: Chris Giovarelli

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