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Intellect

"Oedipus at Colonus" on stage at BYU Sept. 29

The University of Utah's 33rd Annual Classical Greek Theatre Festival presents Sophocles' "Oedipus at Colonus" Monday, Sept. 29, at 5 p.m. at the de Jong Concert Hall at Brigham Young University.

Tickets at $9 for the general public with $3 off with a BYU or student ID are available at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, (801) 378-4322 or at www.byu.edu/hfac. A pre-performance lecture will be available at 4 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

In "Oedipus at Colonus," Sophocles' final play, Oedipus regains his dignity and heroic stature. As his final resting place is sought, his son and the kings of Athens and Thebes vie for him as a talisman and protector.

The Classical Greek Theatre Festival is an annual event created to introduce and sustain the appreciation of ancient Greek theatre across communities and campuses in various southwestern states. It is unique in its attempt to bring ancient Greek theatre to a broad American audience through modern translations, original song and dance.

"Oedipus at Colonus" is directed by Sandra Shotwell, with choreography by Michael Eger and music composed by Tasos Sylianou.

Writer: Rachel Sego

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