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Intellect

New media expert Michael Wesch to speak at BYU forum Jan. 22

Michael Wesch, professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University, will present a Brigham Young University campus forum address, “The End of Wonder in the Age of Whatever,” Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center.

Broadcast and archive information will be available at byub.org and speeches.byu.edu.

Wesch is a cultural anthropologist exploring the effects of new media on society and culture. His videos on culture, technology, education and information have been viewed by millions, translated into more than 15 languages and are frequently featured at international film festivals and major academic conferences worldwide. He was recently named an Emerging Explorer by National Geographic.

He graduated summa cum laude from the Kansas State University anthropology program in 1997 and returned as a faculty member in 2004 after receiving his doctorate in anthropology at the University of Virginia. Wesch has won several major awards for his work, including a Wired Magazine Rave Award and the John Culkin Award for Outstanding Praxis in Media Ecology.

For more information, contact Wesch at (785) 370-4329, or at mwesch@ksu.edu.

Writer: Hwa Lee

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