Skip to main content
Intellect

New BYU Library Exhibit Celebrates 'Expeditions of Discovery'

This summer, take a journey around the world and back in time with the Harold B. Lee Library's newest exhibition of artifacts from expeditions connected to BYU.

With contributions from the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, the Museum of Peoples and Cultures and the Museum of Paleontology, this exhibit features gems from these cultural institutions on campus. The contributions include: 

  • Allosaurus fossil jawbone and works by "Dinosaur Jim" Jensen, provided by the Musuem of Paleontology
  • Items from the university's first expedition in 1900, loaned by the Museum of Peoples and Cultures 
  • Insects from the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum collection reflecting decades of fieldwork

Located on the main floor (level 3) of the Harold B. Lee Library, "Expeditions of Discovery" runs through September 30, 2014. Admission is free and the exhibition is open during all regular library hours. A large Ceratosaurus skull marks the entrance to the exhibition.
The story of the exhibit, "Expeditions of Discovery," starts with Karl G. Maeser, who asked that missionaries send the school interesting items found during their travels, and continues with educational trips of discovery by professors and students today. 

Chester-Group.jpg

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=