Skip to main content
Intellect

"Modern Perspectives on Nauvoo and the Mormons" reprints available

From BYU Religious Studies Center

The Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center recently reprinted a small number of copies of its book, “Modern Perspectives on Nauvoo and the Mormons.”Originally printed in 2003, this rare book is now available at the BYU Bookstore for $29.95.

In 2001, Larry E. Dahl and Don Norton supervised the interviewing of 26 long-term Nauvoo residents and compiled their conversations into the book “Modern Perspectives on Nauvoo and the Mormons.” This record of oral history was intended to preserve otherwise undocumented historical accounts.

The city of Nauvoo, Ill., was once a bustling city with thousands of citizens but is now a quiet, peaceful town of about 1,200 citizens. Many of the city’s long-term residents are descended from Nauvoo’s early settlers who are conversant about family stories and historical events, including the causes of conflict and violence that led to the exodus of members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

For more information, contact Stephanie Wilson at (801) 422-3293.

Writer: Stephanie Wilson

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
June 22, 2021
New BYU research recently published in the journal of Social Media + Society sheds light on the motives and personality characteristics of internet trolls.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 17, 2021
Engineering graduate student Jacob Sheffield has created a tiny origami-based device that serves as a miniature windshield wiper for laparoscope camera lenses.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
June 13, 2021
BYU geography professor Matt Bekker says record-breaking temperatures certainly contribute to Utah's water problem through evaporation, but the less-noticeable warming trend over months and years is the bigger problem. Most of the last 20 years have been drought years.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=