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Intellect

Mind-body connection topic at annual Counseling Workshop March 4

Featuring Ellen Langer, professor of psychology at Harvard University

The Brigham Young University Counseling and Career Center and the Department of Conferences and Workshops will host the Annual Counseling Workshop Friday, March 4, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the BYU Conference Center.

Ellen Langer, professor of psychology at Harvard University, will be the keynote speaker for the event, presenting on her recent book “Counter Clockwise,” which investigates how minds and bodies are connected and affect overall health.

Registration is $215, or $80 for graduate students. Workshop attendees will be eligible to earn university credit for an additional fee. Registration may be completed in person at 120 Harman Continuing Education Building, by phone at (801) 422-8925 or online at ce.byu.edu. Please note that online registration closes March 1, and at–the–door registration will be accepted on a space-available basis. Early registration is encouraged.

Langer’s research has been featured in more than 200 research articles and six academic books. She has been honored with six distinguished awards, including the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest of the American Psychological Association. She has been a guest lecturer in Japan, Malaysia, Germany and Argentina.

For more information about the workshop, contact Conferences and Workshops at (801) 422-7589, or visit ceweb.byu.edu/cw/cwcounse.

Writer: Mel Gardner

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