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Intellect

Mike Leavitt to headline BYU Law and Religion Symposium Oct. 5-8

Michael O. Leavitt, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, will headline the 15th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium Sunday through Wednesday, Oct. 5-8, at Brigham Young University’s J. Reuben Clark Law School.

The keynote addresses will be given by Secretary Leavitt and Xinping Zhuo, director of the Institute of World Religions at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

Students may attend free of charge, but all attendees must register in advance. For more information or to register, visit www.ICLRS.org or contact Deborah Wright at (801) 422-6842 or wrightde@lawgate.byu.edu.

This year's symposium theme is "International Protection of Religious Freedom: National Implementation" with sub-themes including "Evolving International Approaches to Religious Freedom," and "Emerging Challenges to Religious Freedom: Regional Perspectives."

Delegates at the conference will include more than 70 religious leaders and government officials from more than 40 countries.

Writer: Brady Toone

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