Skip to main content
Intellect

M. Winston Egan at BYU forum July 23

M. Winston Egan, chair of the Department of Teacher Education at Brigham Young University, will speak at a BYU forum on Tuesday (July 23) at 11:05 a.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

The forum will be broadcast live on KBYU-TV (Channel 11) and KBYU-FM (89.1) as well as the BYU-Television satellite network. It will be rebroadcast Sunday, July 28, on Channel 11 at 6 and 11 a.m., on 89.1 FM at 8 p.m. and on the BYU-Television satellite network at 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

This forum address will review the historical roots of American public education, highlighting the decline of social capital in the United States and articulating the public purposes of education and schooling.

Egan graduated from BYU in elementary education, completed a master's degree in early childhood education at Oakland University and concluded his doctoral preparation at the University of Florida in special education with an emphasis in behavior disorders of children and youth.

He joined BYU in 1993 as a member of the Educational Psychology Department.

Prior to coming to BYU, he served 20 years at the University of Utah in the Department of Special Education in the Graduate School of Education.

His specialty areas include behavior disorders in children and youth, service learning video-anchored instruction and teacher education. He has published in each of these areas and recently completed, with colleagues at the University of Utah, the 7th edition of "Human Exceptionality: Society, School and Family" published by Allyn and Bacon.

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 21, 2021
Immigrant communities such as a Finnish settlement in Scofield and a Chinese community in Salt Lake City may not be as well-known or remembered but still play an important part of Utah’s history — a history rich with diverse stories of faith and perseverance.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 20, 2021
A single bottle of tonic to cure diabetes, cancer, ulcers and dizziness. Raisins and currants for Christmas mince meat pies. Midwifery courses taught by a certified female doctor, $30 a term. A souvenir stone from the Hill Cumorah, “guaranteed genuine,” mailed from New York for 25 cents.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=