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Intellect

Legendary White House correspondent at Sept. 23 BYU forum

Helen Thomas, former United Press International White House Bureau Chief and "First Lady of the Press," will speak at a campus forum Tuesday, Sept. 23, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center on the Brigham Young University campus.

The forum will not be broadcast on the BYU broadcasting channels.

Thomas is regarded as a trailblazer in women's issues, having broken through barriers for women reporters. Thomas was the only woman print journalist to travel with President Richard Nixon during his 1972 visit to China.

The World Almanac lists Thomas as one of the 25 most influential women in America.

Thomas worked for more than 40 years as White House correspondent for United Press International. Thomas began covering White House news in 1960 during the John F. Kennedy presidential campaign. She currently works as a syndicated columnist for Heart Newspapers.

Thomas was born in Kentucky and raised in Detroit, Mich. After graduating from Wayne State University, she began working in the journalism industry as a copy girl, eventually moving to United Press International to work in the press corps.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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