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Intellect

Lara Saville to give faculty oboe recital Nov. 6

The Brigham Young University School of Music presents Lara Saville in a faculty oboe recital Thursday, Nov. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

The performance is free and the public is welcome to attend.

She will perform music by Henri Dallier, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Carl Reinecke and Benjamin Britten.

Saville says "Temporal Variations" by Britten will be especially interesting to the audience, because of the history of the work.

"It was written in 1936, right before World War II," Saville said. "It has a very strong antiwar statement. It was only performed once in his lifetime, and then lost for years in someone's attic. It was found in the 1980s, so it's just recently come on the oboe scene. I don't think that the Britten work has been played at BYU yet."

Saville, a doctoral student at Arizona State University, is teaching oboe classes at BYU this semester while full-time faculty member Geralyn Giovannetti is on sabbatical. Saville graduated from BYU in 1999.

She will be assisted by Robin Hancock on the piano and Laura Griffiths on the horn.

Writer: Rachel M. Sego

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