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Intellect

Kennedy Center guest to present a Saudi strategic view of the Middle East

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies will host His Royal Highness Prince Abdulaziz bin Talal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud in 253 Martin Building at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24.

Prince Abdulaziz was born in Riyadh to Prince Talal bin Abdulaziz, president of the Arab Gulf Program for United Nations Development (AGFUND), and a grandson of King Abdulaziz Al Saud, founder of modern-day Saudi Arabia.

He received his early education in Saudi Arabia under his father’s auspices and in Switzerland. He is in the U.S. for advanced study and training. His interests range from the confluence of technologies and the oil services industry to real estate, health care, and Islamic finance as applied to business and education.

Prince Abdulazizhas been involved in humanitarian and philanthropic activities both in Saudi Arabia and in the international community. He participates with several nonprofit organizations in the U.S., including the National Council for U.S. and Arab Relations (NCUSAR) and the Concordia Summit.

He previously served as chairman of Arab Open University Forum and currently is chairman of Transpacific Broadcast Group, Proserve (Saudi Arabia) and the Global Presence Company, and he is a member of the Islamic Finance and the Global Economic Crisis Forum.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

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